Luke McKee – Aspergers Syndrome

I have recently become aware of a disorder that answers a lot of questions as to Luke McKee’s anti-social aspergersbehaviour not only for me, but to many others in the community. I’m sure that McKee will deny the following, however, we have documents his father has written discussing his sons condition.

I am writing this so others that have been targeted by McKee, may now understand the actions he takes. This is by no means a “get out of jail” card for McKee. but purely to inform the people that have been continually bombarded by McKee’s disgusting banter.

What Is Asperger Syndrome?

Asperger syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) considered to be on the “high functioning” end of the spectrum. Affected children and adults have difficulty with social interactions and exhibit a restricted range of interests and/or repetitive behaviors. Motor development may be delayed, leading to clumsiness or uncoordinated motor movements.

Compared with those affected by other forms of ASD, however, those with Asperger syndrome do not have significant delays or difficulties in language or cognitive development. Some even demonstrate precocious vocabulary – often in a highly specialized field of interest.

The following behaviors are often associated with Asperger syndrome. However, they are seldom all present in any one individual and vary widely in degree:

• limited or inappropriate social interactions
• “robotic” or repetitive speech
• challenges with nonverbal communication (gestures, facial expression, etc.) coupled with average to above average verbal skills
tendency to discuss self rather than others
inability to understand social/emotional issues or nonliteral phrases
• lack of eye contact or reciprocal conversation
obsession with specific, often unusual, topics
• one-sided conversations
• awkward movements and/or mannerisms

(Researched from – http://www.autismawareness.com.au/information/diagnosis)

Diagnostic Criteria for 299.80 Asperger’s Disorder

    1. Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
      1. marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
      2. failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
      3. a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
      4. lack of social or emotional reciprocity
    2. Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
      1. encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity of focus
      2. apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
      3. stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
      4. persistent preoccupation with parts of objects
    3. The disturbance causes clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
    4. There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years).
    5. There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self-help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction), and curiosity about the environment in childhood.
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